The Art of Using-Persuasion-Angles In Marketing & Sales

Persuasion angles are nothing new, but they are important when considering how to craft personalized messaging for marketing and sales outreach. Persuasion angles aren’t exactly Marketing and Sales 101; they are a good dimension to incorporate in outreach efforts when you have a more sophisticated sense of your persona’s needs/behaviors. 

Perhaps the most well-known persuasion angle is FOMO, or fear of missing out. You’ve probably grown up seeing it in infomercials. With the simple phrase, “before it’s gone,” thousands of people would reach for their phone to order an item before it disappeared. 

FOMO is simple. It’s effective.

Why does it work? It plays on people’s response to scarcity. When you think something will be gone soon, you go and get it. 

And scarcity is just one of the persuasion angles you can use for marketing.

The psychology of persuasion

We can’t talk about persuasion without mentioning Dr. Robert B. Cialdini’s book. Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion was published in 1984. Several decades later, its principles are still the bedrock of sales and marketing. 

In the book, Cialdini talks about the 6 Principles of Influence. Time and again, these principles are proven to make people take the action we want them to. Aside from scarcity above, the other five are reciprocity, commitment/consistency, social proof, authority, and liking. 

Reciprocity

This is one of the foundations of content marketing, because delivering free and valuable content will endear you to your target audiences. The psychology behind this: people like to pay off debts, or simply, to give back when they get something in return. 

People are more likely to choose your service or buy from you if you’ve already helped them beforehand. 

For example, let’s say you have lead magnets of free guides. You get people’s emails. You consistently deliver more tips. Or perhaps they see your helpful videos on Facebook. They know who you are, they know you know what you’re doing, so they choose you and buy from you. 

Commitment/consistency

Marketers work this principle two ways: in themselves and in their customers. 

Brands need to deliver a consistent message, although what that consistency looks like will look different from one brand to another, and a lot of that can depend on a brand’s niche. For example, brands selling cookware or ingredients might post a recipe three times every week, like clockwork. Or a professional might post a Live video on Facebook or Instagram on a fixed schedule. 

On the customer’s side, marketers offer small, risk-free commitments. A 20-minute free training. A free guide. A week-long trial. Or Netflix’s famous 30-days free offer.

Someone who has watched your 20-minute free training is more likely to sign up for your webinar. Someone who downloaded your free guide may engage with you, allowing you to find out how to pitch to them further down the sales pipeline.

And free trials and free days almost always convert to subscriptions.

Social proof

The root of the referral system. Or in the digital age, the review system. Also known as, “Everyone’s doing it” and the “wisdom of the crowd.”

When you go to WordPress, they make it a point to tell you that they power 28% of the internet. A restaurant, a law firm, or a plumbing service might boast about “Hundreds of 5 stars from Yelp.”

People trust you when other people already do. People also interact with you when other people already do. This is why you get a snowball effect of interaction once you get your community started.

According to research, 41% of respondents said the most important factor in engaging with a local business’s Facebook page is seeing customer reviews or ratings

Authority

Another version of social proof: the proof from an authority figure. Influencer marketing taps into your niche’s influencer’s existing followers. It’s an effective, powerful strategy that can help you grow your target market, if you partner with the right person.

Witness brands paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to celebrities and micro influencers on Instagram. 

Liking

Liking encapsulates all you do for marketing and sales. You want your target market to like you. You use data to make your marketing messages effective, relevant, and likeable. You use social media to post likeable content. Not “Like” as in Facebook or Insta Like, but real, honest-to-goodness humanity that makes them interact with your brand just because they identify with you or understand that you get them and their needs. 

You see likeability used in campaigns like Burger King’s and Wendy’s snarky Twitter accounts. And of course, in About pages where you share your humanity with your audience. Your story and history can make people convert. 52% of site visitors go to your About page. They want to know more about you. 

The art of using persuasion angles

Visual harmony for attraction

The visual aspects play a big role here. A marketer’s social media posts and emails should all look good, not for the sake of looking good, but to effectively attract and persuade. 

A lot of tactics go into this: the golden mean, the psychology of color, fonts and styles, and even formats: photo, video, graphic or meme, which also change depending on the persuasion angle you’ll use. 

For example, commitment/consistency is usually minimalist in design to keep the focus on the CTA buttons. Look at Netflix’s simple homepage. 

On the other hand, authority is best accomplished with striking photographs or videos featuring the influencer

A/B tests and using AI for data collection and analysis of customer behavior can give you insight on what your audiences respond to when it comes to visual assets. Do you get more engagement with videos? Do you get more clicks using this or that color scheme? 

Using words to remove friction 

This is where AI and martech tools like Wrench can help so much, giving you insight on what words to use. 

In the first place, martech tools and AI can help you accurately create your personas to ensure marketing and sales work in sync for the personas and the content.

  • Persona: Who is the customer?
  • Buyer stage: What do you say to them? 
  • Persuasion: How do you say it? 

Ultimately, insights help you with persuasion. It’s not what you say, it’s HOW you say it. 

For example: 

“The perfect solution to your problem” 

  • Names the problem and then provide the solution.
  • Buyer stage: Awareness and Comparison
  • Persuasion angle: Reciprocity

How is that reciprocity? Because the marketer offers a demo of the solution to show you a concrete way it can help you. This content/persuasion angle is particularly effective when marketing services and tools. Messaging might also feature copy like: “You’ll save money” or “Don’t pay more” or “You’ll save time.” 

Crazyegg, InVideo, and so on — they all offer free trials or free reports that support their claim of being the solution provider.  

OR, if your audience already knows the solution, show them what they should be looking for by naming the pain points and the product benefits that solve them.

Limited time-offers that belong to the scarcity persuasion angle also don’t easily work unless they come with the persuasion of risk-free commitment

The scarcity isn’t enough. People don’t want to feel rushed. But they will take it on if there’s no risk involved, or if the commitment gives them MORE, like a huge discount, or an exclusive access to, let’s say, a webinar or video chat with an influencer. In that case the scarcity teams up with reciprocity and authority  

Using humor and storytelling to convert now or later. 

Humor and storytelling are part of the Liking persuasion angle. Your audience are more likely to like and remember you if you entertain them, or evoke their emotions through storytelling.

Laughter makes you happy, and you always have a soft spot for brands that make you happy. 

While humor evokes happiness, storytelling is proven to engage your audience so much better and more effectively than facts alone. Dates and names on an About page are hardly interesting, but add a nice story of how the founder founded the company, and you’ve automatically got more clout. 

Case in point, Apple was never more persuasive than during the height of Steve Jobs’ charismatic storytelling behind his success and every new development he made. 

Persona, proposition, persuade

Persuasion angles are powerful tools to use for your sales and marketing teams. They add more relevance and power to every content you deliver at the right moment to the right people.   

However, remember to collect and analyze insights on your personas, and get absolute clarify on your value proposition, so that all your persuasion strategies are aligned. 

Dan Baird

You may also like
Why EQ in Marketing & Sales Is More Important Than Ever
Blog

Why EQ in Marketing & Sales Is More Important Than Ever

Emotional intelligence will and should always be present in sales and marketing, even more so with the implementation of artificial intelligence and martech. As long as we serve humans, we need human empathy to balance the AI biases and impersonality.
Read More
The Art of Using-Persuasion-Angles In Marketing & Sales
Blog

The Art of Using-Persuasion-Angles In Marketing & Sales

Persuasion angles are nothing new, but they are important when considering how to craft personalized messaging for marketing and sales outreach.
Read More
Optimizing Your Sales Pipeline During COVID-19
Blog

Optimizing Your Sales Pipeline During COVID-19

AI also traditionally relied on historical data to make predictions about the future. But we’re in a new world now; the past can only tell us about the past. Today’s AI and automation are equipped to start aggregating new data to begin to make accurate predictions/prescriptions.
Read More
How marketing and sales AI can make your brand more human
Blog

How marketing and sales AI can make your brand more human

AI helps us collect, build, and act on, a huge bank of emotion-related data. And personalization -- if it's going to be effective -- must invoke human emotion.
Read More
This is a Good Time to Revisit Your Value Proposition
Blog

This is a Good Time to Revisit Your Value Proposition

Depending on context, the value proposition a company has today — no matter how good — might need to change. Perhaps some your prospects have altered or changed their priorities? Does your value proposition still resonate with these new priorities?
Read More
Using AI to do business mid-crisis and beyond
Blog

Using AI to do business mid-crisis and beyond

The brands that are doing the best marketing/outreach right now in the time of COVID-19 are those that understand their target audience’s fear and struggle, not just right now with the world turned upside down, but all the time.
Read More
Cold Calling is Not Dead
Blog

Cold Calling is Not Dead

At this time, while we’re all on limited contact with people, cold calls might be appreciated and come back in style, especially when it’s done right. Everyone’s craving contact -- yes, even introverts. The cold call just has to be done right.
Read More
Keeping the balance against AI biases
Blog

Keeping the balance against AI biases

Algorithms are only as good as the humans who create them. And humans can try, but can’t prevent, having their own biases. AI develops its own, which can lead to wrong decisions that can be disastrous if the humans who make them rely solely on AI data and don't balance the biases.
Read More
Marketing & Sales Beyond the Pandemic 101: Keep Building
Blog

Marketing & Sales Beyond the Pandemic 101: Keep Building

Crisis management is for achieving some modicum of stability amidst incredibly choppy waters. When it has no end in sight, adjusting replaces managing. We accept this new environment we need to work in (we have no choice), so we need to think about ways we can prepare to face it with competence now and later on.
Read More
COVID-19 Marketing: Goodwill Marketing is the Current Brand Marketing
Blog

COVID-19 Marketing: Goodwill Marketing is the Current Brand Marketing

For some companies, it's business as usual in some ways. But at the same time, it’s not at all business as usual at all. Crisis marketing has evolved to include goodwill marketing. There are delicate nuances marketers should consider and apply to their messaging.
Read More
Marketing in the Time of COVID-19
Blog

Marketing in the Time of COVID-19

How are you doing in your part of the world? How are your family and friends? How’s business going? You...
Read More
Revisiting Personas: Why they matter in the age of personalization
Blog

Revisiting Personas: Why they matter in the age of personalization

“Persona” is in “personalization.” That's obvious (and cheesy) I know, but most of us know by now that personas are...
Read More
Personally Identifiable Information (PII) 101
Blog

Personally Identifiable Information (PII) 101

Personally identifiable information, or PII, is self-explanatory and it’s nothing new. It hails from the age of mail-order catalogues and...
Read More
The rise of micro-moment: tiny moments, BIG impact
Blog

The rise of micro-moment: tiny moments, BIG impact

“Be quick, be there, be present.” That’s from Google, when they first coined “micro moments” in 2015. With the age...
Read More
Personalized marketing is omnichannel marketing
Blog

Personalized marketing is omnichannel marketing

Personalized marketing is omnichannel marketing. After all, your marketing strategy is not personalized at all if your customers have to...
Read More
The shift toward guarding customer data will boost influencer marketing
Blog

The shift toward guarding customer data will boost influencer marketing

The Cambridge Analytica scandal still makes people paranoid about Facebook, but marketers weren’t really surprised about it. We know how...
Read More
New tech makes account based marketing more achievable
Blog

New tech makes account based marketing more achievable

The marketing landscape is shifting in this new decade, thanks to marketers finally implementing martech (including AI) to adapt to customer demands and expectations. The same agility and intelligence we can utilize for hyper-personalization can be applied to account based marketing.
Read More
Customer Data 101—How to Collect and Use It in Lawful and Good Ways
Blog

Customer Data 101—How to Collect and Use It in Lawful and Good Ways

It’s projected that 2020 is the year marketers will finally stop being so scared that personalization is invasive, by making personalization impressive.
Read More
The marketing trend of the decade: insight-driven and customer-focused
Blog

The marketing trend of the decade: insight-driven and customer-focused

It’s hard or near impossible to plan for the future, especially with constant changes and updates to marketing innovation, but marketing leaders are always a good sounding board on giving insight and even predicting what would catch on sooner or later.
Read More
Is CRM finally ripe for disruption in 2020?
Blog

Is CRM finally ripe for disruption in 2020?

CRM can and should serve marketers on the challenge of attracting new prospects and keeping existing customers. The answer to that challenge is staying relevant and in step with customer preferences and expectations. 
Read More
1 2 3
Previous Post
Next Post

LEAVE A REPLY